Menu

This Is An Insight

An Introvert's Musings On Personal Growth And Society

Books

#Books

I was at the tail end of a generation of girls who wanted a guy to take an ice pick in the ribs for them. Max was of a generation that believes in self-preservation at all costs. Even if the […]

https://www.facebook.com/vintageanchor
#Books

Inspiring: Sylvia Plath

“And by the way, everything in life is writable about if you have the outgoing guts to do it, and the imagination to improvise. The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.” — Sylvia Plath Credits: Vintage Books And Anchor Books […]

Ragtime, E. L. Doctorow

They realized that there was a process of magnification by which news events established certain individuals in the public consciousness as larger than life. These were the individuals who represented one desirable human characteristic to the exclusion of all others. The businessmen wondered if they could create such individuals not from the accidents of news events but from the deliberate manufactures of their own medium. If they could, more people would pay money for the picture shows.

Ragtime, E. L. Doctorow, A Plume Book, p. 71.

It’s all about celebrities

Ragtime, E. L. Doctorow

At palaces in New York and Chicago people gave poverty balls. Guests came dressed in rags and ate from tin plates and drank from chipped mugs. Ballrooms were decorated to look like mines with beams, iron tracks and miner’s lamps. Theatrical scenery firms were hired to make outdoor gardens look like dirt farms and dining rooms like cotton mills. Guests smoked cigar butts offered to them on silver trays. Minstrels performed in blackface. One hostess invited everyone to a stockyard ball. Guests were wrapped in long aprons and their heads covered with white caps. They dined and danced while hanging carcasses of bloody beef trailed around the walls on moving pulleys. Entrails spilled on the floor. The proceeds were for charity.

Ragtime, by E. L. Doctorow, A Plume Book, pages 34, 35.

Genius E. L. Doctorow On Celebrity Charities

Thus with continuous concentration and the expenditure of enormous amounts of energy he tried to keep himself from slipping into the vast distances of his unhappiness. It was all around him. It was a darkness as impudently close as his brow. It choked him by its closeness. And what was most terrifying was its treachery. He would wake up in the morning and see the sun coming in the window, and sit up in his bed and think it was gone, and then find it there after all, behind his ears or in his heart.

Ragtime, E. L. Doctorow, A Plume Book, p. 151

From Ragtime, E. L. Doctorow

%d bloggers like this: